Food Storage and Shelf Life

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EmailDiggRedditShare

Food Storage Shelf Life

Food storage generally refers to long term foods that are low in moisture and can be stored for a long time.Shelf life is defined in two ways: “best if used by” – the length of time foods are best in taste and nutrition. “life sustaining” food shelf life – the length of time foods can be stored and still be edible.

There can be a big time difference between these two types of food products. Foods bought at the grocery store can have a shelf life of a few days to several years, depending on the type of food, the storage conditions, and the packaging. That’s why those products have a “best if used by” date which is required by law.

The “life sustaining” foods are those that are packaged specifically for long term storage. The estimated shelf life for many of these products has increased to 30 years or more (see chart below).

If stored more than  30 years, taste and nutritional quality will decline, depending on the quality of the food when first packaged. However, studies have shown that these foods, even if stored past their designated time, retain their calories and calories will sustain life in an emergency and prevent starvation.

Food storage shelf life for long term food storage depends on 4 main criteria:

  • Temperature
  • Moisture
  • Oxygen
  • Light

Let’s take them one at a time.

Temperature

Foods stored at room temperature or   cooler (75°F/24°C or lower) will be nutritious and edible much longer   than previously thought according to findings of recent scientific   studies. Foods stored at 50°F to 60°F (which is optimal) will last longer than foods stored at higher temperatures. Heat absolutely destroys food and its nutritional value. Proteins break down and some vitamins will be destroyed. Taste, color, and smell of some foods may also change.

Moisture

The reason long term food storage is dehydrated or freeze dried is to eliminate moisture. Too much moisture promotes an atmosphere where microorganisms can grow and chemical reaction in foods causing deterioration that ultimately can sicken us.

Oxygen

Too much oxygen can deteriorate foods and promote the growth of microorganisms, especially in fats, vitamins, and food colors. That is the reason to use oxygen absorbers when dry packing your own food products.

Light

Exposure to too much light can cause deterioration of foods. In particular if affects food colors, vitamin loss, fats and oils, and proteins. Keep long term food storage in low light areas for longest shelf life.

Fats & Oils

Fats and oils are a special case when addressing their shelf life. The problem with storing oils and fats long term  is  that they go rancid rather quickly. Rancid fats have been implicated in increased rates of heart disease, arteriosclerosis and are carcinogenic (cancer causing).

Because of the issue of fats and oils becoming rancid, many books and articles don’t mention or don’t want to give a specific shelf life for them. So I’m just going to say that they need more frequent rotation – at least every 1 to 2 years – if unopened. They will last a much shorter time if opened and kept at room temperature.

Freeze-Dried or Dehydrated Foods?

Most freeze-dried and dehydrated foods have a shelf life of 25+ years. The freeze-dried process retains more of its nutrition and it tastes better than most dehydrated foods that are packaged as a full meal of, say, pasta, meat, vegetables, and a sauce. If purchasing dehydrated foods such as pasta, rice and beans individually packaged, there is little difference.  Because freeze-dried food is processed in an oxygen-free environment, there is no need for preservatives or additives.

Although dehydrated foods have a long shelf life, they usually require more water and a longer cooking time to prepare. Freeze-dried foods require very little water and just minutes of soaking (not cooking) to reach the ready-to-eat stage — very quick and easy.

I believe it’s best to have some of both. Depending on the emergency, there may be certain circumstances when time is of the essence and a quick freeze-dried meal would be the best course of action. Other times, dehydrated foods are just as good.

Long Term Food Shelf Life Chart

(The years listed for shelf life assumes ideal storage conditions, i.e. low moisture, low light, cool temeratures, and low oxgen content.)

Food “Life Sustaining” Shelf-Life                     Estimates (In Years)
Apple slices 30
Alfalfa Seeds 8
Bakers Flour 15
Barley 10
Black Turtle Beans 15 – 20
Blackeye Peas 15 -20
Buckwheat 15
Butter/margarine Powder 15
Cocoa Powder 15
Cornmeal 5
Cracked wheat 25
Durham Wheat 8 – 12
Flax 8 – 12
Flour (white) 10-20
Flour (whole wheat) 10-20
Garbanzo Beans 15 – 20
Garden Seeds 4
Gluten 5
Granola 5
Honey, Salt and Sugar Indefinitely
Hulled Oats 30
Kidney Beans 20
Lentils 20
Lima Beans 20
Millet 8 – 12
Morning Moo 10
Mung Beans 8 – 10
Onions 8 – 12
Pasta 30
Pearled Oats 10
Pink Beans 20 – 30
Pinto Beans 30+
Potatoes (flakes, slices, diced) 30
Powdered Eggs 15
Powdered Milk 20
Quinoa 8
Rice (brown) 6 months
Rice (white) 25+
Rolled Oats 30
Rye 8
Small Red Beans 8 – 10
Soy Beans 8 – 10
Special bakery wheat 25
Spelt 12
Sprouting Seeds 4-5
Triticale 8 – 12
TVP 15 – 20
Unbleached Flour 5
Vegetables (most) 20-30
Wheat (hard white) 30
Wheat (hard red) 30+
Wheat flakes 5
Whey Powder 15
Yeast 2

 

Source: family-survival-planning.com